A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Novel Exercises for Historical European Martial Arts

So, when you aren’t practicing drills or reading treatises there are a few things you can do to help get your body into shape. I won’t go into the basic stuff that is readily available in many formats but I will go into a few suggestions that are a bit unusual or are not widely known outside of their niche or help with building up the arm below the elbow which most generic exercises don’t focus on.

One of the reasons for the inclusion of some of the exercises and tools below are that you can do them while being a couch potato when your exercise/swordplay motivation ebbs. Little things make a big difference. If you can get your lower arms stronger or have more endurance you will find it is easier to get back into HEMA practicing later as you won’t get so fatigued or have as much difficulty doing different maneuvers.

Think of a feedback cycle. When the motivation is gone do the little stuff so you’re ready when the motivation comes back to jump in without to much loss of function or even improvement.

I will start saying I am no expert but I created this for people who aren’t experts and aren’t in great shape who are wanting to get in better shape so they can get more out of their bodies during practice. If you have a suggestion or warning please comment.

At the end, I am adding any exercises that were provided as comments when I posted to the HEMAA Facebook Page along with solo sword drills that are HEMA specific and I think work well.

When I got my buckler I instantly thought that it might be a great tool for low weight reps while watching videos on my PC. I do punches, moulinets (using the handle like it is a hilt), and windshield wiping wrist rotations. You easily do hundreds of reps while being a couch potato and if you already have the buckler it doesn’t cost anything extra. Below is an image of antique buckler I found at the Lennart Viebahn website. There are some really cool miniature arquebus pistols there which are really impressive for the time period there.

buckler_1

Just found this intriguing video and haven’t tried it yet from Sword Carolina:

NSD Power AutoStart Spinner is the “Featured image” for this post because it is super cool and it is what I have. There are more expensive versions and cheaper ones than the one I linked to but this is the best bang for your buck. This is an exercising tool utilized heavily by golfers who want to build dense and dextrous forearm muscles just like we do. It is fun and easy to use. It is also used by people to help with carpal tunnel and tendonitis. There are many different brands and versions. Below is a “Powerball” model review from a hockey player but the basic concepts apply.

Kettlebells are can be very useful. Be careful getting started and don’t buy a cheap one unless you’re ready for a 35 pound or more ball to go flying should a handle break. Get one that is all one piece without any welding or anything that might hide any welding marks. If you can get started with an instructor at least one time before you do anything crazy or weird with this as you can injure yourself if your form stinks. I don’t have one myself but messed around with one back in high school.

The Gripmaster Hand Exerciser is useful for building individual finger, hand, and wrist strength and is another thing you can do maybe at work or while reading. There are many different variations and brands to choose from. Most have a set level of resistance but a few have resistance that is variable which is useful if you are using this to recover from a hand injury and building back up your strength. The video below is for guitar and bass players that I used many years ago when I played both. He has some suggestions on different exercises.

Agility Ladders are really useful for building up your lower legs and helping you become more cognizant of your footwork. Some allow you to move the bars to different lengths and hook up extra ladders or miscellaneous items to make a little obstacle course. This can help when you are trying to do solo drills and need to force yourself to think outside of the linear box common to kendo and modern olympic fencing. Taking advantage of traversing and sidesteps are an important part of your martial art toolset.

Resistance bars are great for recovery and are designed to help with tennis elbow which can plague a swordsman as well. The brand I linked to rates the resistance by color so be careful picking one that is appropriate for you. They also are very good at improving grip strength. There are a lot of different exercises out there that use these flexbars for different issues so be sure to look up different exercises or invent your own just don’t break your wrist.

Battle Ropes are a lot of fun and help out with building both your arms but also your core and is a very inexpensive way to get a full body workout. It will wear you out as muscles you rarely use flare up and make sure you’re paying attention. Start with a few basics and build your way up. I recommend starting at 1.5 inch and 40 feet if you’re not in fantastic shape which is what I have.

Balance Pads are very good for improving your balance and building your lower leg strength and tone. They will help your footwork and if you’re anything like me you probably need the help.

Gravity Fitness Stretch Strap is good for helping increase your flexibility and range of motion. If you’re going to be practicing lunges a lot this might be useful for you.

 

Suggestions from Facebook:

Shanee Nishry’s website showcases her exercise regime of about 30 minutes a day of Meÿer Square / Cutting Diagram Longsword drills. Check it out.

Susan Kirk mentioned that Indian Clubs can really help with both strengthening arms and shoulders as well as helping flexibility of wrists, elbows, and shoulders. It is great for both balancing out muscles on the left and right sides as well as improving coordination.

Indian Clubs at Purpleheart Armoury.

Incline Steel Club is on sale and it should arrive soon.

Solo HEMA Drills and Exercises:

If this doesn’t get your newbie muscles burning quickly you’re either in great shape or doing it wrong!

This drill gives you something extra to do by forcing you to change directions while swinging your sword. Footwork is my greatest weakness I think so try this or variations of this out.

Blood and Iron is a great resource.

Matt has quite a few different solo drills on his site. I like this one and the ones he made when his right hand was injured.

This flow exercise has some direction changes and good practice for attacks from the Italian Longsword perspective.

And this video below is a 64 cut drill by Matt Galas I haven’t even tried but is something I can look forward to being able to do one day!

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Websites to Buy Swords and Equipment

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournaments

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Novel Exercises for Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournament Ready and Training Ready Standards

 

(Edit) It seems that this topic is unpopular. I approached this topic as someone familiar with patents, copyright, and creating standards.

From that pov I see issues like Combatcon’s equipment recommendations allowing modified lacrosse gloves, no shin protection, and with the only stated requirement of a mask being behind the head protection. I have read a lot of equipment rules for tournaments and they are often vague and ambiguous. Also, looking at equipment on retailer websites there is a dearth of info. Most clubs seem to be very insular using the same stuff they’ve been using from the start rather than a mix of goods. Part of this is a reluctance to lay down good money on something they aren’t sure of or confident in.

I would suggest an approach to making these standards as something like this:

I would test protective gear with a broken feder that has splintered leaving a sharp edge or for standardization sake three or four different thrusting and cutting sharps using a machine with a test dummy with the protective gear in question. This machine would hit the gear with an ever increasing amount of force let’s say start at 100N and go up a 100N each time noting the point when damage begins and the point when the protection is penetrated.

Then I would go through all the different major makers of the gear in question. I would then compare them and plot out the standard deviations and compare that quantized information to qualitative information from actual HEMA experts.

I would then try and measure the typical amount of force used by a trainee during practice using the typical weapons in HEMA and compare that to the piercing point/breaking point/cutting point of the gear. I would then get a set of average strikes from a dozen random tournament contestants. Then I would get the hardest hitters and try and guestimate the maximum force a HEMA defender is likely to ever get hit with and correlate that with the different tested gear.

By combining the quantitative analysis of how the gear handles piercing, blunt, and slashing hits from sharp weapons and maybe even a mace or staff along with broken weapons with expert qualitative advice you can get a rough idea of training quality, tournament ready, and tournament approved gear.

That way you can also rate gear for Longsword, Staff, rapier, arming sword etc. A Longsword training level jacket might be tough enough to be tournament ready for a saber for example.

Once you have those standards than the makers of the gear can then go back and beef up their gear or drop it down a bit to provide a cheaper but still quality product. If a jacket maker could make a safe but minimal product for entry level at a low price point without sacrificing too much quality than they make money and more new people get into HEMA.

Then once the enthusiast gets some practice and wants to go compete they can make the choice of getting gear that is very good and ready for tournament level play or they can go to the max and get gear that is overkill and very high quality meeting the highest standards in the industry because there will now be standards.

(/edit)

So, as a novice I’ve been reading a lot about HEMA and coming from an outside viewpoint it is a bit confusing and a lot of things are ambiguous with a lot of regional variation. This naturally emerges from a bottom up structure run by a number of very individualistic people who can bonk you on the head with steel if they disagree with you!
If my ideas have already been beaten around to death I apologize. I’m sure the elders of the tribe keep seeing the newbies saying the same thing over and over.

Anyway, it occurred to me that a way to both help the merchants who sell and the people who make gear for the HEMA enthusiast and to help people make informed decisions when buying gear it seems obvious to me that there should be set/s of standards for different types of activities for training and tournaments.

When I buy a video game I see a set of minimum requirements and recommended requirements which give me a rough idea what kind of PC I need to have to run the game. They usually err on the side of caution for minimum requirements and overkill for the recommended.

Rather than having a deeply piecemeal and haphazard approach to each tournament having different gear accepted and having the fear that your gear which was good enough for a tournament in Chicago but not accepted in Denver it seems to me that there are many organizations in HEMA and more importantly many Tournament Leagues.

Imagine if you will a swordmaker able to put on his website “Midwest Historical Fencing League Tournament Ready Feder” and\or “HEMA Alliance Tournament Ready Sidesword.”

Another approach is for the manufacturer’s to get together to make a standard. This placates those who prefer to avoid any appearance of an overarching “federation”.

If the dozen or so makers of masks for example made a tournament ready and a tournament recommended standard for HEMA and all followed it than the buyer would know better what they are getting versus relying on Cen 1 and 2 which help but aren’t perfect with most of the other gear lacking even that nebulous quantifiable standard.

Imagine a poor quality gorget NOT being able to have any official HEMA stamp of approval so some new person doesn’t buy it trying to save money and get hurt badly.

The customer (us) could be confident that the gear they are buying is not only good for their league but it is also tested and approved by their HEMA organization. This would make makers of quality equipment have an easier time selling gear as doubt would be removed. Your only choice now is to ask around your club and look up the occasional youtube review, blog,  or the handful of reviews at Measure and Weigh.

Also, having standards would make it easier for new makers to enter the market. If a feder needs to be between x length and y length, use m through g quality metal, have x flex, and weigh between c and g weight to be tournament approved than having clear standards would improve the quality of our gear and help the manufacturers know what they need to provide to hit any HEMA requirements.

You could have let’s say the red dragon gloves be “Longsword Training Ready for Prairies Historical Fencing League” which tells the buyer that the gloves are okay for practicing or training but in the long run they will need to get better gear or just skip them to gear that is approved.

A pair of fencing gloves could be “Rapier and Saber Training Ready for HEMAA” and a jacket could be the same letting the buyer know that the jacket isn’t approved or ready for Longsword Training so they don’t hurt themselves through ignorance and are educated about what works for one type of HEMA practice or tournament.

You could even have “Ready” and “Approved” as tiers of quality as well. So, a new Regenyei Feder could be “HEMA Ireland Tournament Approved” while a low end feder that is still solid but not great could get “HEMA Ireland Tournament Ready” while a truly mediocre feder but not a bad or dangerous one could get “HEMA Ireland Training Ready” tag. Take the guesswork out of buying the goods. Take the guesswork for the poor people who have to look through all this gear and be the jerk that tells someone that they can’t participate or even worse feel sorry for them and let them participate in an event in which they get hurt!

Take the guesswork out of buying the goods. Take the guesswork for the poor people working or volunteering at HEMA tournaments who have to look through all this gear and be the jerk that tells someone that they can’t participate or even worse feel sorry for them and let them participate in an event in which they end up hurt!

A way this could really benefit is in gear that we appropriate from other sports like arm or shin protection. If we could go to Adidas and say “your shin protection is great so we would like you to market it as a soccer AND HEMA shinguard.” That way if they did that a soccer player could come across a shin guard and sees the HEMA logo and wonders “What’s that?” and looks us up. If they do that and see it is approved to take sword strikes that puts a lot of confidence that it will take a set of cleats. This would increase attention to HEMA and make it easier to find quality gear.

And by having each league and each member of the HEMA Alliance make decisions on gear approval it might help move regional products into the global market while protecting each leagues autonomy. Say you’re a jacket manufacturer with great quality and fair price but you’re in X country and you want to get some exposure you could send a jacket to each league you’re interested in for them to test it out. If you have a good product not only are you going to get your jacket listed by that league or group as approved you could have them review the gear and word of mouth means a lot. If an instructor says “this jacket is amazing” how many students who respect them might think about picking up that jacket that wouldn’t otherwise look for a foreign made and formerly unknown product?

Say you’re a jacket manufacturer with great quality and fair price but you’re in X country and you want to get some exposure you could send a jacket to a couple of leagues you’re interested in for them to test it out. If you have a good product not only are you going to get your jacket listed by that league or group as approved you could have them review the gear online and word of mouth is a very powerful tool. If an instructor says “this jacket is amazing” how many students who respect them might think about picking up that jacket that wouldn’t otherwise look for a foreign made and formerly unknown product? We get better gear and more choices in that gear and the merchant sells more. Win-win in my book.

It also might be useful to have a model or version number on gear. Say a 800N Jacket type Y v2 2015 by X. That way if there happens to be a bad version or model than the league and the manufacturer can alert its customers about it and there can be a caveat and it is clear what type of jacket is being discussed for those manufacturers who make more than one type of the same product.

By having a version history and easy tracking of how that product has performed we can take a more scientific approach to safety and quality control. I know that the Konig Gloves have gone through different permutations so it would be nice if for example a tag said version 4 2016 just in case there was a safety issue with one version anyone who had the glove could just take a look and see if they needed to worry.

Check out my other blog posts in this series with more to come:

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Websites to Buy Swords and Equipment

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournaments

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Websites to Buy Swords and Equipment

Websites that sell equipment are listed below by continent and by nation. Feel free to comment to add more sites that I’ve missed.

My original post A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts kept on growing so I decided to break it up into smaller more focused posts such as this one. A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournaments has some advice for buying equipment appropriate for tournament bouts along with the actual requirements that each of the tournaments has for sword and equipment quality. As always your best bet is to ask questions either to instructors or clubmates or on the WMA Reddit or HEMA Forums for the suitability of a given retailer or manufacturer.

This blogpost is now listed here at the Reddit Online HEMA Resources (r/HEMA) page which has an excellent collection of links for the HEMA and WMA enthusiast.

Europe:

UK:

Danelli Armouries (Beautiful swords with long wait list)

Leon Paul

The HEMA Shop

The Knight Shop

Corsairs Wares

Paul Binns Swords

Germany:

Trainingsschwerter

Allstar International

Sword Experts

VB Sword Shop

Die Seelenschmie (Swords)

Poland:

Sparring Gloves  Sparring Gloves Facebook

SPES Historical Fencing Gear

Neyman Fencing

Comfort Fencing

Silk Fencing (Synthetics)

PBT Polska

Szymonchlebowski (Swords)

Ensifer (Swords)

Art of Swordmaking by Maciej Koupciuch

Czech:

Mac Arms (Swords)

Swords (C.K. Kowarna)

Elgur (Swords)

Kovex Ars

Lutel Armoury

Armory Marek

Fabri Armorum

Switzerland:

Fechtwaffen Shop (Pretty much everything is here)

Spain:

Black Fencer

The Time Seller

Grant Esgrima

Arcensis

Costumbres Medievales

Hungary:

PBT Historical Fencing

Regenyei (Swords!)

Viktor Berbekucz (Swords)

Austria:

Swordbag

France:

Black Armoury

Faits d’Armes

Le Colporteur de l’histoire (Jackets, masks, rawlings, and regenyei’s)

South Fencing

Sport 7

Gael Fabre (Swordsmith)

Italy:

Gajardoni (Lajalo) (Air Masks and fine quality jackets and breeches. Ships internationally) Disclosure: I am a customer.

Negrini

Del Tin (Tin Ancient Weapon)

Thokk WeaponMaster Gauntlets (indiegogo)

Sweden:

Saint Mark (Koning Gloves)

Denmark:

Gladius

Finland:

Miekkailutarvike

Netherlands:

Zwaard En Volk

Pro Gauntlet (HEMA Gauntlet in Alpha Stage of Production)

Russia:

Hema Fencing

Slovenia:

Krsticic Swords

North America:

Canada:

Darksword Armory

Dark Age Creations

SGT Blades

USA:

HEMA Supplies (We currently import Regenyei Armoury swords and Sparring Gloves.)

Southcoastswords (Blackfencer Synthetics in USA)

SPES Historical Fencing Gear (USA)

Leon Paul (USA)

Absolute Force

Wild Geese Fencing (Steel Swords)

Horsebows (Archery and Masks)

Woodenswords: Purpleheart Armoury (Pentii Synthetics and Ensifer Feders)

That Guy’s (Beautiful looking Gorgets)

Destroyer Modz (Gorget and Mask Mods)

Winter Tree Crafts (Gorget)

Albion Swords

Black Horse Blades

Castille Armory

Alchem (Swords Wholesaler)

Benjamin Arms (Swords)

Zen Warrior Armory (SCA and Fencing)

Arms & Armor (Swords)

Swordsman’s Shop (smallsword)

Rockwell Classical Fencing (Foil, Saber, and Epee)

Triplette Competition Arms (Sports Fencing)

Hanwei (Swords)

Darkwood Armory

Piranha Gear (Fencing Gloves and Gorget)

CAS Iberia

New Stirling Arms (Wooden Wasters)

Little Raven (Wooden Wasters)

Sword Equip (HEMA Gear and swords by Szymon Chlebowski)

Therion Arms (Export and Import Globally Weapons and Armor)

Asia:

China:

Wukusi

Australia:

Medieval Fight Club

WMA Shop

Leon Paul Australia

Eureka HEMA Supplies

 

Miscellaneous:

HEMA Leather Crafts on Facebook (gorget, baldrics, and belts)

HEMA Professional Market on Facebook

USA HEMA Marketplace on Facebook

HEMA Marketplace on Facebook

Peter Johnsson on Facebook (Swordsmith) Personal website is down.

Cavalier Attitude (The Rapier Bag)

 

Other Blog posts by me:

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Websites to Buy Swords and Equipment

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournaments

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Novel Exercises for Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournaments

This is a work in progress built from my original A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts post that I decided to spinoff into its own page as the Guide is far larger now than I had initially intended and has become a little unwieldy like a Montante in the hands of a five year old.

As a novice I have decided to try my best to make these guides to help people learn more about HEMA who don’t have the time or inclination to search and research for hours on the web and to try and distill what I’ve read into something easy to understand. Often things get lost in translation when dealing with topics outside of your understanding and experience. The experts know everything basic so will often use shorthand or gloss over things that you as the newbie have no clue about leading to misunderstandings and frustration.

If you would like me to add your Tournament just add a comment below.

Tournaments are a chance to test your mettle against opponents from outside your club. This is very important in order to avoid and detect weaknesses that might have developed unnoticed by your fellow fencers you practice with and to become exposed to different styles and ways of fencing.

A new site called HEMA Ratings has setup rankings and scores for over a thousand fighters from all over the world with different weapons including Longsword, rapier, sabre, singlestick, sword and buckler, and sidesword. So, after you compete at your first acceptable tournament you can watch your score and rank change as you become a better fighter and get more experience fighting new people.

Afterblow (HEMA Competition News) is starting in 2017 and will have a whole slew of useful information about Tournaments which will be something to look forward to next year.

This HEMA Alliance Events Page just soft launched which is wonderful.

It is also worth knowing that there are Leagues of HEMA which can make going to multiple tournaments in a region have a new dimension of complexity.

Historical Fencing Event Notification Page on Facebook is another resource.

Tournaments are different in that the rules are more formal than bouts at your club or with friends and each one will have different equipment requirements depending on the type of bout from Longsword to Ringen. This is important to keep in mind as swords and gear preferred or allowed at one tournament may be forbidden at another. So make sure you consider this when you are making your expensive choices on gear. These requirements may also hint at the quality or lack of quality of different equipment.

They may also have different rules in adjudicating a bout so it would be wise before a tournament to have some practice bouts using those rules in the weeks proceeding a tournament. This applies even if you are not planning to go as it is good to be flexible in your fighting. Different rules may encourage different optimized behavior by a fencer. If the tournament penalizes heavily double hits than you will want to prepared for that while sports fencing often encourages unhealthy defensive habits because of the rules of engagement.

An article worth reading If You Practice HEMA, You Should Be Competing in Tournaments.

General takeways applicable to many tournaments for equipment needed for Longsword are a Fencing Mask with back of the head protection, Gorget, Padded Fencing Jacket, Heavy HEMA Gloves, Arm and Elbow Protection, Knee and Shin Protection, shoes, and a cup for men. Some require a plastron and padded breaches as well.

There also must be no bare skin shown when Fencing with weapons and some explicitly state that if they can see skin if you raise your arms than that is unacceptable. I would recommend skipping the basic mask and go to CEN 2 at the very start as there really isn’t that much of a price difference and it makes a big deal for durability and longevity. Vasaslaget explicitly states CEN 2 or 1600N at least as a requirement to compete and forbids hockey gear.

Feders from Ensifer, Regenyei, Danilli Armouries, Comfort Fencing, Darkwood, Chlebowski, Pavel Moc, SGT Blades, Mac Arms, and Castille are usually accepted. For some other manufacturers only certain models are allowed but in general feders with rolled, ‘nail like’, or widened tips with well rounded cross guards are accepted. I would also recommend models with rounded pommels because some have wickedly dangerous styles.

Few tournaments allow Hanwei or Red Dragon Feders. Many don’t allow Darksword Armory as well.

Check out A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Websites to Buy Swords and Equipment to see where and what websites you can look at to buy your gear.

Very importantly make sure you have safe and appropriate luggage/bags to carry your goods for your method of travel. Don’t skimp on a cheap and poorly made bag if flying or taking a bus and it can be useful to think of how to secure your gear if it is going to be out of your sight.

If you enjoy watching bouts in older tournaments check out HEMA LiveStream Series on Facebook. It hasn’t been updated in a while but is worth checking out.

Tournaments:

Europe:

Swordfish

Swordfish in Gothenburg Sweden

Swordfish Equipment Requirements

Swordfish 2016 Livestream and a fantastic match illustrating a less commented type of bout with unarmed combat using Ringen below.

Fight Camp

Fight Camp in Coventry England

Fight Camp Rules and Gear Requirements

Helsinki Longsword

Helsinki Longsword in Helsinki Finland

Helsinki Open Longsword Equipment Requirements

Astolat Open

Astolat Open in Godalming England

Astolat Equipment Requirements

Vasaslaget

Vasaslaget in Uppsala Sweden

Longsword Rules Vasaslaget 2016

Dreynevent

Dreynevent in Vienna Austria

Martail Arts Historical Italian (XVII was 2016)

National HEMA Tournament in Faenza Italy

North America:

Longpoint

Long Point in Baltimore Maryland

Longpoint Rules (Page 4 Gear)

Longpoint Youtube Subscription Page

Longpoint South in Orlando Florida

CombatCon

CombatCon in Las Vegas Nevada

CombatCon Rules

Iron Gate

Iron Gate Exhibition in Danvers Massachusetts

Iron Gate Equipment Requirements

Capitol Clash

Capitol Clash in Washington D.C

Capitol Clash Longsword Requirements

HEMA-Cornhusker State Games

HEMA-Cornhusker State Games in Bellevue Nebraska

Rules for State Games at Musketeer Fencing Club Site

Icebreaker 2017

Icebreaker 2017 in Fort Snelling Minnesota

Icebreaker Equipment Requirements

Australia:

World Broadsword Championship

World Broadsword Championship in Sydney Australia

World Broadsword Championship Rules

Swordplay Australia

Swordplay Australia in Brisbane Australia

Swordplay Australia Approved Gear

 

More of my Novice’s Guide posts:

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Websites to Buy Swords and Equipment

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournaments

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Novel Exercises for Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts

As a novice I’ve had to do a lot of searching to find basic information about HEMA.

Recently the HEMA Alliance posted a fantastic page (New to HEMA) which should be your first site you visit. If I had access to this page it would’ve spared me a lot of time and effort so enjoy!

(Edit: I am continually adding new content as I find it so check back regularly)

Additional more focused posts that are part of my Novice’s Guide.

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Websites to Buy Swords and Equipment

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Tournaments

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Historical European Martial Arts

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA: Novel Exercises for Historical European Martial Arts

Sections include Starting HEMA, Tournaments, Youtube subscriptions relating to HEMA, Equipment requirements, Websites by Continent/Nation that sell HEMA Gear, Gear reviews, Hacks and Customizations, and educational and entertaining videos that I found interesting.

Starting HEMA:

New to HEMA

Find a local club here

Wiktenauer (Free Library!)

HEMA Forums

Western Martial Arts on Reddit

HEMA News Blog

HROARR is an independent, neutral meeting ground and resource site

Historical European Martial Arts Coalition

xKDF (KUNST DES FECHTENS NETWORK)

HEMAA (HEMA Alliance)

Johannes Liechtenauer’s Recital (PDF)

Fiore de’i Liberi (The Flower of Battle PDF)

Long Sword Techniques and History (PDF)

Longsword Study Aid

What is HEMA? (podcast)

Starting with HEMA: A Personal View (Encased in Steel Blog)

Sword Carolina (Online HEMA School)

Medieval European Martial Arts Guild

Schola Forum

Esfinges Facebook group for Women in HEMA Ask here for gear advice for women.

Afterblow: Hema Competition News (Brand new site for HEMA Events/Calendar)

Tournaments:

[Edit: I’ve spun off the Tournament related information into its own post below:] 

A Novice’s Guide to HEMA Tournaments

Swordfish

Long Point

CombatCon

SoCal Swordfight (Facebook group as the website is dead)

Fight Camp

World Broadsword Championship

Astolat Open

Swordplay Australia

Helsinki Longsword

Iron Gate Exhibition

HEMA-Cornhusker Nebraska State Games (Facebook Event Page)

Capitol Clash (Washington D.C)

Youtube Videos Subscriptions:

Schola Gladiatoria

Duello Learning

Blood and Iron

London Longsword

Learn Swordfighting

Septem Custodie

HEMA Reviews

Swordfish 2016 Livestream

Swordfish 2016 Ringen Match

Equipment:

One of the big things novices such as myself want to know is what do we need to start practicing HEMA as far as basic beginning gear and what to look for in the long term should you progress to tournament level expertise. For some equipment it might be better to just skip all the way to the best for both protection and to avoid having to upgrade later at greater expense. This is where asking questions of experts really pays off. What equipment does your instructor recommend?

Absolutely make sure that you get a cup like a Nutty buddy, Diamond, or Shock Doctor if you’re a guy and the ladies have their own version which is generally suggested equipment.

Don’t skip or skimp on a gorget (pronounce the ‘t’ as in \ˈgȯr-jət\) from the french gorgette in the 15th century C.E.

Explaining Mask Standards (Read this before you get your mask)

GLOVES FOR LONGSWORD FENCING (APRIL 2016) (Read before you buy Gloves)

HEMA Gloves Facebook Group

Reddit HEMA Gear List (May 2016)

THE STATE OF THE ART: Current gear and weapon options as of 12/2016

HEMA Training Longswords Compendium (List of training Longswords by HEMA Reviews Blogspot)

Feder Market Table (Shows stats/costs on many feders)

Aidan Blake’s Feder and Simulator Research

Tips on HEMA sparring swords (Schola Gladiatoria)

Informal Survey on Ordering from a HEMA manfacturer

Tournament Gear Requirements: (Read this for an idea on what you might need for your local and regional tournaments and for a guide to quality to future proof your gear.)

Swordfish Equipment Requirements

Longpoint Rules (Page 4 Gear)

CombatCon Rules

Fight Camp Rules and Gear Requirements

London Open 2015 Equipment Standards

World Broadsword Championship Rules

Astolat Equipment Requirements

Swordplay Australia Approved Gear

Helsinki Open Longsword Equipment Requirements

Capitol Clash Longsword Requirements

Websites that sell equipment are listed below by continent and by nation. Feel free to comment to add more sites that I’ve missed.

Europe:

UK:

Danelli Armouries (Beautiful swords with long wait list)

Leon Paul

The HEMA Shop

The Knight Shop

Corsairs Wares

Paul Binns Swords

Germany:

Trainingsschwerter

Allstar International

Sword Experts

VB Sword Shop

Die Seelenschmie (Swords)

Poland:

Sparring Gloves  Sparring Gloves Facebook

Historical Fencing Gear (Spes)

Neyman Fencing

Comfort Fencing

Silk Fencing (Synthetics)

PBT Polska

Szymonchlebowski (Swords)

Ensifer (Swords)

Czech:

Mac Arms (Swords)

Swords (C.K. Kowarna)

Elgur (Swords)

Kovex Ars

Lutel Armoury

Armory Marek

Fabri Armorum

Switzerland:

Fechtwaffen Shop (Pretty much everything is here)

Spain:

Black Fencer

The Time Seller

Grant Esgrima

Arcensis

Costumbres Medievales

Hungary:

PBT Historical Fencing

Regenyei (Swords!)

Viktor Berbekucz (Swords)

Austria:

Swordbag

France:

Black Armoury

Faits d’Armes

South Fencing

Sport 7

Italy:

Gajardoni (Lajalo) (Air Masks and fine quality jackets and breeches. Ships internationally)

Negrini

Del Tin (Tin Ancient Weapon)

Thokk WeaponMaster Gauntlets (indiegogo)

Sweden:

Saint Mark (Koning Gloves)

Denmark:

Gladius

Finland:

Miekkailutarvike

Netherlands:

Zwaardenvolk

Pro Gauntlet (HEMA Gauntlet in Alpha Stage of Production)

Russia:

Hema Fencing

Slovenia:

Krsticic Swords

North America:

Canada:

Darksword Armory

Dark Age Creations

SGT Blades

USA:

HEMA Supplies (We currently import Regenyei Armoury swords and Sparring Gloves.)

Southcoastswords (Blackfencer Synthetics in USA)

Historical Fencing Gear (USA) (Spes)

Leon Paul (USA)

Absolute Force

Wild Geese Fencing (Steel Swords)

Horsebows (Archery and Masks)

Woodenswords: Purpleheart Armoury (Pentii Synthetics and Ensifer Feders)

That Guy’s (Beautiful looking Gorgets)

Destroyer Modz (Gorget and Mask Mods)

Winter Tree Crafts (Gorget)

Albion Swords

Black Horse Blades

Castille Armory

Alchem (Swords Wholesaler)

Benjamin Arms (Swords)

Zen Warrior Armory (SCA and Fencing)

Arms & Armor (Swords)

Swordsman’s Shop (smallsword)

Rockwell Classical Fencing (Foil, Saber, and Epee)

Triplette Competition Arms (Sports Fencing)

Hanwei (Swords)

Darkwood Armory

Piranha Gear (Fencing Gloves and Gorget)

CAS Iberia

New Stirling Arms (Wooden Wasters)

Little Raven (Wooden Wasters)

Sword Equip (HEMA Gear and swords by Szymon Chlebowski)

Asia:

China:

Wukusi

Australia:

Medieval Fight Club

WMA Shop

Leon Paul Australia

Eureka HEMA Supplies

Equipment Reviews

As I find reviews for products while surfing the web I will collect them here for people to use as a resource.

GEAR:

Masks:

PBT HEMA Warrior Reinforced Mask (Schola Gladiatoria)

PBT 1600n HEMA Mask (Dolans Review)

Leon Paul Titan and Gajardoni Kombat Air (Schola Gladiatoria)

Destroyermodz Custom 82nd Mod HEMA Fencing Mask (NYHFA)

Mask Overlay:

Destroyer Mod Head Protection (HEMA News)

Gajardoni Kombat Air, Leon Paul Titan, and Spes Unity Overlay (London Longsword)

Jackets:

Spes Hussar Jacket (HEMA Review)

Gajardoni Challenge Jacket and Breeches (London Longsword)

Gajardoni Challenge Jacket (HEMA News)

SPES Axel Pettersson (Schola Gladiatoria)

SPES Axel Pettersson Fencing Jacket (Aidan Blake)

Neyman Augmented (HEMA Reviews)

Neyman HEMA Fencing Jacket (Schola Gladiatora)

Superior Fencing Jacket (Blood and Iron)

Black Armoury HEMA Jacket (Schola Gladiatora)

Steel Mastery Gambeson (Jon Burke of Lionheart Historical European Swordsmanship) (Taiwan)

Breeches:

Neyman Standard Trousers (HEMA Review)

PBT 350n Fencing Pants (Measure and Weigh)

Gorget: There really doesn’t seem to be very many reviews on throat protection gear relating to HEMA. This is important so hopefully some experienced fencers can let us know the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly when it comes to this.

Winter Tree Brigandine (Aidan Blake)

Absolute Force Neck Guard (Skallagrim)

Medieval Fight Club Gorget (HEMA Collective)

Gloves:

A Look at Many Gloves (Skallagrim)

3 Fingered Sparring Gloves (Aidan Blake)

Neyman Thokk (KAB Fencing)

Koning Glove (Sacramento Frei Fechter)

5 Fingered Sparring Gloves (Francesca Terminiello)

Absolute Force Hema Deluxe (Aidan Blake)

Absolute Force HEMA Gloves (Matthew Brown)

Neyman Inigo Montoya (Oliver Goras)

Neyman Inigo Montoya (Bellows Freifechter)

SPES Heavy sparring gloves (Schola Gladiatoria)

Gajardoni Lajolo Kombat Gloves (tehBar0n)

Red Dragon Gloves (Schola Gladiatoria)

Elbows and Forearms:

SPES Forearm and Elbow Protector V2.0 (Aidan Blake)

Neyman Fencing forearm and elbow (Poll Mak)

Knees and Shins:

Red Dragon Leg Guards (Schola Gladiatoria)

Red Dragon and Baseball Knee/Shin (Skallagrim)

Knee Pro Ultra (Measure and Weigh)

Swords:

Non-Steel Practice Swords (Skallagrim)

Messers:

Purple Heart and Black Fencer Synthetics (Aidan Blake)

Scottish Basket hilt Broadsword:

Black Fencer Synthetic (Academy of Historical Fencing)

Synthetic Feder:

Blackfencer V4 Federschwert (Blood and Iron)

Black Fencer Feder (HEMA Review)

Steel Feder: (Check out above the Longsword Compendium link and the Feder Market Table for more info)

Comfort Fencing Dobringer feder (HEMA Reviews)

SGT Blades 3 models of Steel Feders (Blood and Iron)

Szymon Chlebowski Feder (NYFHA)

Castille Armoury and Regenyei Feders (Sacromento Frei Fechter)

Regenyei Standard Steel Feder (Aidan Blake)

Regenyei Standard Steel Feder (Medieval Review)

Regenyei Steel Feder (Schola Gladiatora)

Regenyei Steel Feder (HEMA Reviews)

Darksword Armoury Steel Feder (Skallagrim)

Moc Steel Feder (HEMA Reviews)

Steel Sidesword:

Regenyei steel sidesword (Stoccata Historical Fencing)

Danelli Steel Sidesword (Il Segno)

Rapier:

Danelli Steel A588 Wallace Rapier (London Longsword)

Steel Arming Sword:

Fabri Armorum Training Steel Arming Sword (Schola Gladiatora)

Hacks and Customizations:

Painting a Fencing Mask (Medieval Review)

Back of Head Gajardoni Ancient Air Mask hack (Poll Mak)

Educational and Entertainment:

The Feynman Technique (How to master a subject)

Defense for the Throat: A Layered Approach ‘History of Throat Protection’ (Knyght Errant)

Nova Fechtbuch (Collection of HEMA videos and Blogs)

Highland Broadsword Posters from 1799

Back to the source – Historical European Martial Arts documentary

Seminar with Jake Norwood (cutting mechanics)

Fior di Battaglia: medieval longsword techniques (Akademia Szermierzy)

Longsword Duel Scene (Adorea Olomouc)

Magna Moosey Scene (Adorea Olomouc)

Out of This Century blogs (everything from clothing to essays on roman gladiator style arena fights in San Francisco)

I Just Saw this Picture and I’m So Disturbed. Because it’s Me.

Powerfully and viscerally written piece on racism.

feminewbie

13653430_1070638483027630_2650636656912865440_o-1 This morning The Love Life of an Asian Guy posted this picture on facebook with the following commentary:

This is one of the most powerful images I’ve seen in years.

You’re peeking directly into the laboratory of white supremacy. A system that will send TWO men in full riot gear to arrest ONE Black woman for one purpose: give her a criminal record.

If she is charged (most Black protestors are) for participating in a peaceful protest, she’ll be forced to disclose her new criminal record on ALL job applications and applications for rent.

That one small change can limit where she works, how much she can get paid, and where she can rent.

The implications are LIFE CHANGING. This act of arresting peaceful Black protestors is SYSTEMATIC RACISM AT WORK, BEFORE YOUR VERY EYES.

“You’re a Harvard Law graduate? 7 years of experience? Nice! Ooh, it looks like…

View original post 2,409 more words

The Best and Worst of 2015 – Genetic Genealogy Year in Review

Lots of good Genealogy and DNA testing info on this blog.

DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy

2015 Best and Worst

For the past three years I’ve written a year-in-review article. You can see just how much the landscape has changed in the 2012, 2013 and 2014 versions.

This year, I’ve added a few specific “award” categories for people or firms that I feel need to be specially recognized as outstanding in one direction or the other.

In past years, some news items, announcements and innovations turned out to be very important like the Genographic Project and GedMatch, and others, well, not so much. Who among us has tested their full genome today, for example, or even their exome?  And would you do with that information if you did?

And then there are the deaths, like the Sorenson database and Ancestry’s own Y and mitochondrial data base. I still shudder to think how much we’ve lost at the corporate hands of Ancestry.

In past years, there have often been big new…

View original post 5,020 more words